Tag Archives: W. S. Merwin

On Year 5: March’s Poems


This is the month which, proverbially, comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb.  We’re waiting for that lamb.  Snow, snow and more snow, and on days when there isn’t any snow falling, the temperatures are frigid.  However, the first day of spring comes in March, and somehow that always makes people …

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On Year 5: January’s Poems


Back to school after the Christmas break, and the world is frozen and lonely and still.  Spring is still a long way away, and somehow, we have to muddle through snow and sub-zero temperatures, through frozen pipes, through all the hard work required to keep the fires burning in the wood stoves. Fortunately, at school, …

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On Year 5: October’s Poems


I’ve been seeing Facebook memes about how October is so many people’s “favorite color.”  It seems to have taken the fancy of any number of poets, writing about the month, about the season, about things which are part of both.  Exploring the poems of October has been quite an interesting adventure.  One person in my …

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On Year 5: August & September’s Poems


This month marked the beginning of the fifth year of reading a poem a day to my students.  All of them.  Every period, every day.  Such a simple thing to do–and yet.  We don’t do it.  We live in a school culture which devalues poems, calls them “hard,” and makes students frightened of them.  That’s a …

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On Year 4: May’s Poems


The homestretch, the final month of the school year.  It’s been wet and squelchy, unsettled, cold.  The kids have been antsy and bad-tempered.  I’ve tried to give them poems that provided something warm and uplifting.  I’m not sure I was always successful–and quite frankly, this has been a year where the students have been really …

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On Year 4: January’s Poems


Happy New Year! It’s cold.  Really cold.  Polar vortexes taking over and everything.  Pipes freezing.  Cars not starting.  Wind chills in the -30s.  And two and a half months until spring.  It’s hard to read, let alone write.  Still, there are cold poems out there for the harvesting, and I’ve been delivering them to the …

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