Tag Archives: Meg Kearney

On Year 5: August & September’s Poems


This month marked the beginning of the fifth year of reading a poem a day to my students.  All of them.  Every period, every day.  Such a simple thing to do–and yet.  We don’t do it.  We live in a school culture which devalues poems, calls them “hard,” and makes students frightened of them.  That’s a …

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On Year 3: April’s Poems


April is the cruelest month, and the coolest.  April is, of course, celebrated as National Poetry Month.  In April, just like Chaucer’s pilgrims, I always feel restless when the snow recedes and the flowers begin teasing, when the birds come back, when the mud oozes forth.    In the poetic realm, I am not, by …

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On the Second November’s Poems


In school, November, traditionally, is the shortest month.  That means, of course, the fewest number of poems for my classes.  November is also deer- hunting month here in mountainous central Maine, so many of the poems I chose for the month had to do with deer, and the woods, and things that the boys in …

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On May’s Poems, and a Bit of Reflection


To all intents and purposes, this was the last month for my daily poetry reading experiment:  the last day of class for seniors was Wednesday, May 25th, and quite frankly, I had the poem chosen for that day for quite some time. And it has been an experiment.  Because I started every class this year …

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On November’s Poems


Here we are again, at the end of another month of experiments in poetry.  The students in my classes are all acclimatized now:  we cannot start class without a poem first.  So that’s one mindset down.  A boy in fifth period spent days and days frowning at the poems I read, until one day he …

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On October’s Poems


Continuing my practice, since the conference at the Frost Place, of beginning classes by reading poetry…   This year the advent of October, and the end of baseball season, and the looming of winter, left me with a feeling of dread.  I hoped to combat that with the poems I chose to open my classes …

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