Tag Archives: Linda Pastan

On Year 5: January’s Poems


Back to school after the Christmas break, and the world is frozen and lonely and still.  Spring is still a long way away, and somehow, we have to muddle through snow and sub-zero temperatures, through frozen pipes, through all the hard work required to keep the fires burning in the wood stoves. Fortunately, at school, …

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On Year 4: May’s Poems


The homestretch, the final month of the school year.  It’s been wet and squelchy, unsettled, cold.  The kids have been antsy and bad-tempered.  I’ve tried to give them poems that provided something warm and uplifting.  I’m not sure I was always successful–and quite frankly, this has been a year where the students have been really …

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On Year 4: March’s Poems


March is supposed to come in like a lion and go out like a lamb.  Right.  This year, March came in like a lion, stayed like a lion, and is going out complete with sleet and snow and–in the yard outside my classroom windows–still two feet of snow.  Blasted lion.  Spring ostensibly is here, or …

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On Year 3: December’s Poems


Sometimes an amazing thing happens.  You are plugging away, sharing the news article of the week, as chosen by the librarian, with your classes:  it happens to be about a fire in a Bangladeshi garment factory, and a boy says, “That reminds me of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory!”…So you dig out your age-old copy of Fragments …

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On the Second April’s Poems


April is a month of contradictions.  Which, of course, might be the reason why I was born in it.  It’s an ornery month, reflecting my personality running up to school’s April break more than a bit accurately. Still, April, of course, is National Poetry Month.  So that’s all the more reason to read poems to …

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On a New School Year, and the Second September’s Poems


A hundred years ago, when I attended the Advanced Placement institute in St. Johnsbury, Vermont with two of my awesome teaching colleagues, the five-day workshop was presented by a man who talked quite a bit about poetry boot camp.  This was what he called the intensive however-long unit on poetry and analysis that he subjected …

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