On Mawkin, All Over the Place


13096109_10153732882738370_8086416485174020945_n“Essentially, this album’s [The Ties That Bind] only preconceived purpose was to simply let you have fun while trying your damnedest to find some deeper meaning. We’re not making a statement apart from don’t hurt yourself while you’re dancing in the kitchen.” –David Delarre, in an interview quoted on the Mawkin website.

Because I have never run across Mawkin here in the land of commercial music, finding them as the support on the Bellowhead farewell tour was a gift.  The band is made up of

13094359_10153732543193370_1627440073039569600_n

Mawkin with Eliza Carthy

the Delarre brothers, David (singer, guitarist) and James (fiddler); Nick Cooke (on melodeon); Danny Crump (bassist); and Lee Richardson (drummer).  Their newest album, The Ties That Bind (which David refers to above) provided the material for their 45-minute set, which I had the privilege to see three times in three days.  The first night, in Bristol’s Colton Hall, as an added bonus, featured guest Eliza Carthy (even in the land of commercial music, I know Eliza Carthy), as James Delarre had a separate engagement.

Each time I saw Mawkin–at Bristol, at Cardiff, and at Brighton–

11248698_10153732883183370_3199520824453628264_n

David Delarre

they opened with “I Can Hew.”  What a choice!  If they intended to draw the audience in to get them up and dancing, this was the way to start.  They won me with the first song.  It helps that there’s a depth to David Delarre’s voice which is particularly attractive.  At Bristol, with Eliza Carthy, she and Nick Cooke played the stomping tune off one another, and their eye contact made it clear that they were more than familiar with the way they played, and the way they fit together.  The energy in the music was

13043632_10153732883023370_6017738230585574632_n

James Delarre and Nick Cooke

inviting.  Of course, once James Delarre returned for the other two shows, the energy was both the same and different–and equally captivating.  I came away each time with this as an earworm.

The other earworm was the “love song” David Delarre claimed they had stolen from Eliza Carthy:  “Love Farewell.”  A week later, and that is the Mawkin tune still running through my head.  Again, it is the combination of David’s singing, and the way Nick and James

13055437_10153732883083370_7084539961684773376_n

James Delarre and Lee Richardson

mesh fiddle and melodeon that stay with me.  The driving nature of both pieces is built on the rhythm foundation of bass and drums; even now that I’m home, I’m dancing in my kitchen as predicted.  My one mistake was not buying the CD at the merch table at any of the gigs (proverbially penny-wise and pound-foolish, me); but I will be buying The Ties That Bind now, because it’s become a musical necessity.

When I parted from Louise, one of the women I’d been touring Bellowhead with, she suggested that next time I’m over, we tour Mawkin.  This is not out of the realm of possibility, I think.  I’m glad to have found them so serendipitously; I’m a fan now.

Postscript:  On the Mawkin homepage, there’s a link to download their bootleg Bath show recording from last November.  DO IT.

dsc_1484-1024x685

 

Advertisements

2 Comments

    Trackbacks

    1. On Touring Bellowhead | Anne's Awesome Adventures
    2. On the Session after Bellowhead at Bristol | Anne's Awesome Adventures

    Leave a Reply

    Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

    WordPress.com Logo

    You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

    Twitter picture

    You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

    Facebook photo

    You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

    Google+ photo

    You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

    Connecting to %s

    %d bloggers like this: